Science Collaboration Series

Learn more about these
fascinating research topics!

Non-profit organizations, the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy and the Oceanic Society, are collaborating with The Joys of Nature to offer a series of science talks that showcase field research.
Groups can book multiple programs which can also be adjusted for the audience, from middle, high school or college level to a general adult audience.

Programs are designed to be one hour including questions.  2020 rates: $150 each when booking 4 or more programs
Program scheduling initially coordinated through The Joys of Nature

Questions/Booking
The Oceanic Society

The State of the World’s Sea Turtles

Plastic Pollution and the Albatross Of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

Blue Habits

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Atlantic White Shark Conservancy

Awareness Inspires Conservation

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The Joys of Nature

Research and Misconceptions about Snakes

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From Atlantic White Shark Conservancy

Awareness Inspires Conservation

This program provides an overview of the work of the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy. The lecture covers a wide range of topics-from the public perception of sharks to the role of sharks to the role of sharks in our marine ecosystem. The ongoing white shark research taking place off the coast of Cape Cod is explained in detail, as well as how that research is connected to white shark conservation. The program wraps up with a discussion on how the presence of white sharks close to shore has specifically affected the Cape community.

More about Atlantic White Shark Conservancy

From the Oceanic Society

The State of the World’s Sea Turtles

Since 2003, an ambitious global effort to prevent the extinction of sea turtles and their habitats has been underway through the State of the World’s Sea Turtles (SWOT) Program. The program has since grown to include hundreds of field-based partners worldwide who contribute sea turtle data, expertise, and other resources to SWOT, and also make use of its products to support their research and conservation efforts. SWOT’s long-term goals are to create a global network of data contributors (the “SWOT Team,” with more than 2000 members), to generate a publicly available, global-scale, geo-referenced database of all nesting beaches, migration routes, and foraging areas for all species and age classes of sea turtles, and to use this information as the centerpiece of a targeted communications effort to reach people everywhere that can make a difference for marine conservation. This talk will explore some of the identified greatest threats to sea turtles (Fisheries Bycatch, Pollution, Coastal Development, Direct Take, Global Warming), and look at the research and solutions being implemented to conserve these magnificent sea reptiles.

More about the Oceanic Society

From the Oceanic Society

Plastic Pollution and the Albatross Of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

Midway Atoll is home to the world’s largest breeding colony of albatross. It is also where the largest nesting colonies of Laysan and Black-footed Albatross are found. Previous data show that nearly 100% of albatross chicks at Midway have plastic pollution in their digestive tract. Since the 1970’s the amount (weight) of this plastic load shows an increasing trend. Plastic pollutions has been identified as a likely and problematic source of organochlorines (and possibly heavy metals) for these two seabirds. Both seabird species feed in ocean areas with exceptionally large concentrations of plastic pollution (due to “gyres” occurring near the breeding site), and they transfer this contaminant containing plastic directly to their developing young through regurgitation of meals throughout the annual breeding season. The albatross has become a poster child for the dangers of increasing levels of plastic pollution in our oceans.

From the Oceanic Society

Blue Habits

There are a few myths we need to get past in the conservation community. One is that the simple act of making people aware in itself changes behavior. Any social scientist will tell you that it doesn’t.The oceans are in trouble, and while there are many different drivers of ocean decline (e.g. overfishing, acidification, pollution, habitat loss), they all share a single cause: human behavior. People put too much in and take too much out of the seas, and if we do not change the way that we behave in relation to the sea, ocean health will only continue to deteriorate. “Blue Habits” is an innovative Oceanic Society program that aims to go beyond simply “raising awareness” about ocean conservation issues to actually motivate, sustain, and measure ocean-friendly changes in the way people act. Working with researchers from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education and Woods Institute for the Environment we evaluated and field tested the potential of Oceanic Society’s weekly whale watch programs operating out of San Francisco, as a venue for motivating lasting pro-ocean behavior. Beyond Oceanic Society, we believe that the nature-based tourism industry is a powerful and yet vastly underused platform for motivating long-term pro-ocean behavior change in travelers.

From The Joys of Nature

Research and Misconceptions about Snakes

There are many misconceptions about snakes, especially venomous species. Many people have negative impressions of snakes from movies and TV, but working with them in the field shows that there is still much to discover about these fascinating animals, far beyond the portrayal of Hollywood. Learn about Joy’s first hand work with several different snake research projects, including some here in the NE, as well as techniques used by field teams. Hear about some of their discoveries, and learn how research is helping to break the cycle of fear by raising awareness of the life history of these amazing animals and the important role these predators play in a balanced ecosystem.

More about Joy Marzolf
and The Joys of Nature